The Law Before Sinai

This is an excerpt from a lengthier article. See here. Many critics of the threefold division of the law—and thus opponents of the idea that God’s law serves as a rule for the lives of God’s New Covenant people—start their theologizing in Exodus with the initial codification of the law. However, if the law is…

Divine Simplicity in Scripture

Divine simplicity, from a classical take, is that doctrine which rejects the notion that God is composed. Simplicity is the antonym, as Herman Bavinck put it, of composition. He says, “the term ‘simple’ is not used here as an antonym of ‘twofold’ or ‘threefold’ but of ‘composite (Reformed Dogmatics, 2.4, p. 177).’” Those of you…

The Break-Up: Molinism & Divine Simplicity

If you’re a Molinist, you have to break up with divine simplicity. This isn’t a problem for many Molinists because a lot of them have already denied the doctrine. While there may be many reasons for this break-up with simplicity (William Lane Craig finds a conflict between it and the doctrine of the Trinity), there…

Church Membership: A Treatise (3)

In this article, I will discuss the Reformational backgrounds of local church membership. Not only will I cover language from both John Calvin and Francis Turretin, but I will also jump forward to men like Charles Hodge. Bojidar Marinov has openly denied that local church membership is mandated in Scripture, and he has also denied…

Church Membership: A Treatise (2)

In the previous article, I surveyed Bojidar Marinov’s views concerning church membership. In this article, I will examine his views in light of God’s holy Word. At the same time, I will construct a biblical case for obligatory local church membership. Historically, both Baptists and Presbyterians have claimed Scripture as their ultimate authority in all…

Church Membership: A Treatise (1)

Issue: A group, which appears to be heavily influenced by a man named Bojidar Marinov, has effectively denied the Reformed doctrine of local church membership. This proceeding set of articles is in response to Marinov’s writings (which were in response to Jeff Durbin, pastor of Apologia Church in Phoenix, AZ), and general discussion on the…

Good Works: A Confessional Perspective

With the recent brush up concerning good works as they relate to the overall plan of salvation, it may be good to look at what the historic Reformed Baptist position was and is. The Confession can give the Christian both a historical and a theological perspective on tough issues such as these. We do not…

Calvin, the Almost Genevan Criminal

When we think of John Calvin, we rarely tend to consider his prolonged involvement in Trinitarian disputes. Calvin usually brings us thoughts of Reformed soteriology, a doctrine of salvation, which later came to rival that of the Remonstrants. But this doesn’t even come close to enveloping the full scope of Calvin’s work. Throughout his time…

NFL Protest: A Veteran’s Take on the Kneeling Controversy

I’ve never seen combat. I should mention that here and now. The fact that I’ve never seen combat may put me a pay grade below qualification when it comes to speaking on issues like this one. That said, I am a veteran. I’ve watched friends suffer from PTSD. I’ve seen men come back from deployments…

Chosen in Christ: A Response to Wagner and Flowers

Chosen. It’s kinda got a ring to it doesn’t it? The word, eklegomai in the Greek, can also be rendered selected, or elected. The apostle Paul uses the term often in his New Testament epistolary writings. Usually, he uses the term in reference to God choosing a particular people for Himself. However, the nature of this selection or election is rather…

The Rise of the “Nones”

But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts: and be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you with meekness and fear. — 1 Peter 3:15 Thousands of articles have been written about Christian apologetics. The church hardly needs another layperson writing about…

Don’t Be a Puritan!

We all aspire to become our heroes. One of my favorite Puritans is John Winthrop. He was a 17th century attorney who also led the “Winthrop Fleet,” consisting of about 1,000 Puritans, across the Atlantic––from Britain to Massachusetts. This would have been a massive undertaking at that time. It’s absolutely fascinating that people back then…

When the Youth Take the Elderly to Church

You may have seen movies where parents were portrayed as forceful, church-going people who shoved their noisy kids down in the pew while smooshing their index finger into the child’s lips whispering, “be quiet!” Throughout the late 1800s and nearly the entirety of the 20th century, parents often struggled taking their children to church. In…