How can it be that thou, my God, shouldst die for me?


In my last post, I addressed the orthodox notion of Mary as theotokos, or mother of God. I concluded that it is indeed right, even necessary, to say that Mary is the mother of God according to God’s human nature in the incarnation of the second Person of the holy Trinity. The basic reasoning is: If … Continue reading How can it be that thou, my God, shouldst die for me?

My Book on Divine Simplicity


Who is God? That’s the most important question anyone could ask. Over the last few years, and especially over the last month or so, there has been controversy among Reformed Christianity as well as the broader evangelical community concerning the doctrine of God. Perhaps the answer to “Who is God?” seems obvious enough. “God is the … Continue reading My Book on Divine Simplicity

Divine Simplicity in Scripture


Divine simplicity, from a classical take, is that doctrine which rejects the notion that God is composed. Simplicity is the antonym, as Herman Bavinck put it, of composition. He says, “the term ‘simple’ is not used here as an antonym of ‘twofold’ or ‘threefold’ but of ‘composite (Reformed Dogmatics, 2.4, p. 177).’” Those of you … Continue reading Divine Simplicity in Scripture

The Break-Up: Molinism & Divine Simplicity


If you’re a Molinist, you have to break up with divine simplicity. This isn’t a problem for many Molinists because a lot of them have already denied the doctrine. While there may be many reasons for this break-up with simplicity (William Lane Craig finds a conflict between it and the doctrine of the Trinity), there … Continue reading The Break-Up: Molinism & Divine Simplicity